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the boston terrorist attacks. back with me, professor gary kessler and former fbi special agent don clark in houston. don, many people complain about the cameras on city blocks, boston is something of a surveillance city. big brother watching. but does living in the digital age make it easier to catch criminals? >> well, i think it certainly assists, you know, because you have the cameras and things out there, and let's face it, we're in an era now where we're going to live with these cameras and they're there, and they do serve a good purpose. and i know there are people that say i don't want everybody watching me and this, we all don't, but the bottom line is that they're there, and they're there to stay, and we also know that they are used as protection devices as well. and there have been a number of people that's been saved and there's been a number of buildings saved and so forth simply because there was an opportunity for cameras there and to be able to see something that someone could be able to stop something before it happened, so i'm not opposed to the cameras. i'm certainly no
and clint will tell you, don clark will tell you, they try to get to a relative's house. this guy is maybe not watching the news if he's running through the yards. he may not see his uncle on television. he may be trying to make his way down to washington, d.c., maybe to new jersey. he could be wounded in a garage or sleeping in the back seat of a car at the junkyard because he's familiar with the area. there's a lot of possibilities. >> don, it is getting dark. this has been since the very early morning hours. obviously people have got to be concerned as they come into the night hours. does this get more dangerous for police and citizens and what happens now as they continue their search in the dark and they haven't been able to find anything with daylight? >> well, you know, that's a good point. i'm glad you brought that up because this is a 24-hour operation from now on until the government, we find this person and take him to justice as they should be. and so what we've got to do is figure out and come to plans as to how we are going to address this during the evening hours. you know,
to don clark, he's a special agent with the fbi. in the 1990s, the world trade center bombing, the first one. thank you for joining us, mr. clark. give us your sense of how you sift through the evidence that has come through with regard to the actual device, the bbs and the nails and the pressure cooker and also the guidance we're getting about what tips to look for. >> well, you know, what we have to is be patient. clearly, chris, we don't live in a world today where people want us to be patient, but you really do have to be patient when you've got this, because the one thing habit it is that number one is we're going to try to find out who put this together and identify those people step by step by step. that's an investigative task that has to be done. and i know that america wants everybody to be taken care of right now, but that can't happen. they've got to get the information there. they've got to determine who these people are and get the investigation going so that they can make the case. because keep in front of us is that at some point in time is that the united states is going
of the new york and houston don clark, a former cia officer gary bern teen is concerned with the veterans for america. don clark, let's begin with you. we appreciate you coming back on. some reports you may know is the fbi is hunting a terrorist sleeper cell linked to both brothers tsarnaev. they specially trained the brothers the cellphone detonation device was very sophisticated. what do you think of this sleeper cell theory? >> well, i think it's out there. i think it's something of a society and certainly the law enforcement and the intelligence community, they clearly know that this is not a hoax. this is not something that somebody is coming up and developing and so forth. those organizations and the type of organizations that are really fertilizing terrorist activities, it's real. and it's real for the united states. i think we've gotten a piece of that here in the last few weeks here, based on the activities that we've taken place there. if you talk to many of the law enforcement people and so forth, they will look back and say, "this had to be an operation by these two young men
of what we've been looking at? we have two former fbi agents with us tonight to help explain. don clark is a former fbi special agent in charge of the houston office. james cavanaugh was special agent in charge of the atf. earlier tonight you were cautioning us to be patient. hard for the news industry to be patient. tell me what the people out there looking for those particles and studying them in a laboratory and profiling as far as perhaps foreign involvement, how are they going about their work starting with yesterday? >> well, first of all, chris, you know, you've got to get organized. the one thing i think the government is doing and the law enforcement and so forth is doing is trying to take care of those people who are hurt and families of wounded and so forth. then we go into the investigate which really starts right from the beginning. and they've got to take their time and really do this the right way. examine everything and go through it like a fine toothed comb as we would say down here in texas. and make sure that they've got all of the details. because a case like this, y
troopers, the police around the world, intelligence agencies. >> and it goes on and on. don clark, you were head of fbi field operations. tonight what are they bracing for? i'm sure they are banking many calls. what is the call that you'd be hoping to get? >> well, the call that you would be hoping to get is that some good, faithful law enforcement agent happened to pick up a person with this description, whether it's in a car chase or somebody running a stop sign or whatever the case may be. that would be the optimum, obviously, to have something of that nature. but, you know, that's pie in the sky, if you will. what the law enforcement has to do is to really take the steps as they can be and as the gentleman said before, number one, take a look at these people, look at the identifications, know what they are about and do as much as you can to find out about those individuals and that can maybe tie you into who they are, where they are, and where they may be -- where they came from and where they may be going. >> michael isikoff, don clark, james cavanaugh, thank you for your time tonight.
olympic bombing and don clark, former agent in charge in houston. michael, let me go to you first. what jumps out at you from the fbi complaint filed today? >> reporter: well, actually, the passage describing the carjacking, a rather chilling account from the victim in which he was -- in which he describes being in his car on a road in cambridge, one of the tsarnaev brothers, the affidavit is not clear which one, knocks on the window, he rolls down the window, that tsarnaev opens the door, gets in, brand dishes his gun, says did you hear about the boston explosion and then adds, i did that. a boast that he was the bomber and then shows him his gun, taking out the magazine, shows the bullet in it, puts the magazine back in and says, i'm serious. he then orders the carjacker to drive him to an atm machine, also to pick up his brother, then take over the car and eventually the car -- the victim is able to escape but that boast, i did that, was one of the more powerful elements in the complaint. >> so it was done as a boast, not a confession, no remorse, no desperation as to why they need m
. >> don clark, old friend, i'm not asking to name names. believe me. you but i hate to see a 24 24 hour period go by without some kind of update to the people in boss doton and the families involved. >> i understand that. >> this 24 hour period, though, is going to be disregarded if they get the right person, they build a proper case, they have the evidence and they prosecute this person company her rent coherently and effectively.her coherently and effectively. >> i want to say one last thing. you're both right that it's appeared to be amateur night at the follies. there is supposed to be a joint terrorism task force. they kooshd natucoordinated wit state and local officials. many years ago i was an intern up in the u.s. attorneys up in boston. those are dedicated professionals. there is supposed to be a structure that's in place that has the coherence to stand up to the stress of this moment. >> i think they need -- okay. that's fair enough. >> excuse me. this is not stress in terms of something that's really terrible. this is a delicate investigation that the law enforcement has to g
the conversation, don clar clark, former head of the fbi in houston. it's good to have you here. i think you could hear gabe's reporting. as we look at the murders of the d.a. and his wife and the murder of the assistant d.a., do you see them as targets of some group? >> i couldn't agree more. as most people are looking at this activity as it had started to unfold, you got to think that this is some type of organized organization or attempting to organize an organization to be able to do whatever that they feel that they should do. and i think they are doing that pretty directly to identify certain people and take actions there and maybe others. and that's why the law enforcement community has no choice now but to really try to protect all of the law enforcement officials that may be close to this activity. >> and as we heard there in gabe's reporting again, we learned back in december that a law enforcement bulletin that went out statewide warning that the aryan brotherhood of texas might try to attack police or prosecutors as retaliation for 34 of its members that were indicted in october of las
borelli, joint terrorism task force. also with us is don clark, former head of the fbi in houston. mr. clark, mr. borelli, thank you for being with us. we would like a sense of what is going on at the joint operating center. don, we're getting reports, we got one from pete williams a few minutes ago that the fbi has been getting names called in. they don't have a matchup yet. where do you think things are going? >> they are getting names called in and jonathan mentioned about running through the databases. that's going to be one of the first steps. they are going to get names and run it through all of the logical databases and see what flushes out. if they get further information, dates of birth or an address, then they will take it to the next logical step. things like looking for phone records, utility bills, anything that can help coop great the information called in and then just, you know, they will keep pulling on that thread until they figure out yes we need to go to the next step or this is washed out. the person is not the right, you know, age or whatever. but they are going
right. don clark, thank you. >> thank you. >> we saw the city come together this morning at the in ter faith service, and straight ahead another moving moment that will show how boston is standing together. you're going to want to see this. angie's list members can tell you which provider is the best in town. you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare. now that we're expecting, i like the fact that i can go onto angie's list and look for pediatricians. the service providers that i've found on angie's list actually have blown me away. join today and find out why over 1 million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. until i had the shingles. i have never encountered such a burning sensation... it was like a red rash. like somebody had set a bag of hot charcoal on my neck. i had no idea it came from chickenpox. it's something you never want to encounter. for more of the inside story, visit shinglesinfo.com some brokerage firms are. but way too many aren't. why? because selling their funds makes them more money. which makes you wonder --
there? roger is an nbc terrorism analyst and former white house counterterrorism official. don clark is a former fbi special agent. good morning to both of you. >> good morning, chris. >> good morning. >> mike rogers said the fbi did a thorough job but not everyone agrees. i guess for starters, let me ask you. is it possible something was missed here? >> well, you know, it's always possible something was missed. we don't know what information the fbi had when they first started to investigate this and you take an investigation so far and you get to a point that you say, okay, we don't have anything here. doesn't mean they stop at that point but it means they didn't have it there. keep it mind when you're involved with terrorists, they do everything that they possibly can to go in another direction so that organizations like the fbi cannot get the information as to what they might be up to. >> you know, there's also some question about not just what happened when he went to dagestan but how he got there. let me play for you what mike rogers had to say because the question is could he
think mr. clark has some great ideas, but i don't think this is a good one and i think we should reject this idea and keep the glass. thank you. >> thank you, are there any other members who would like to speak on the this item? seeing none comment is closed on this item. we have an amended resolution. are there any comments from the board on this item? >> would it be helpful to have mr. clark to speak on these issues. on the maintain ability, i think there were some comments that might speak to that. >> can you please address those questions? >> absolutely. fred clark. let me talk about etfe because it was also raised at the last presentation. we looked very hard at e tfe. it's a wonderful material, a plastic material. if you remember the swim cube at the beijing olympics, that was etfe, the soccer stadium in munich, very well publicized building. it's a great material. the issue is that in our experience it does not age very well. it tends to get dull and tends to get rather used quickly. so it was a material we discarded but we did look at it at some length. the issue of birds and
street, don't fight the fed, and the fed, clark, the fed itself has told us that they're going to keep rates low as long as they need to, until the job market improves. so that would suggest to me you've got a stock market where the path to least resistance is higher. >> as long as corporate earnings are strong, to this point, corporate earnings have continued to be very healthy, and barring a severe u-turn really in the economy, there really is a clear path to corporate america continuing to report good earnings, and in turn, that would support the stock prices. >> good earnings, they got a lot of money in the bank, they're not necessarily hiring people with all that money and that's the thing that really confounds the half of america, terry, who aren't in the stock market. recent cnn/orc poll found 55% investing in the stock market was a bad idea. how do you change the attitude toward investing so more americans can take part in wealth building? you look at for example the lottery. you can't win if you don't play. could you say the same thing about the stock market. if you're not in,
the explosion. i don't know, is richard clarke still with us? let me get back to pierre thomas instead. pierre, from what you're talking to we just heard brad garrett and he's carefully calibrating what he said right now, but are you getting any indication from law enforcement officials right now that they have any idea who might have been behind this? >> again, too early according to my sources. they will have a list of the usual suspects that they will put on the table. but really the key is to try to get that information from the scene to point them in a particular direction. but until that happens, when they have a particular avenue to pursue. what they will look at is they'll go back over all intelligence, some of it which may have been deemed not credible, did they miss anything? they'll comb back through the previous intelligence leading up to today specifically anything that came into the boston area or the east coast. and they'll begin to look back. did we discount anything? did we blow anything away that we thought was not credible that we now know may be credible? that will be part
to keep that city on lockdown. >> pierre, richard clarke, just to underscore, you don't have any other information on this person who's been brought to custody behind brian? >> no, i do not. >> richard, now as the law enforcement officials start to close in on the suspect, anything they can do to enhance the chance to be taken alive? >> if we have his cell phone number -- >> bianna called it. >> if that's his cell phone and he has it and it's on, they know in genoa neighborhood he's in, they'll be able to narrow it down to a cell phone tower. if they can get him to answer the phone, they'll take a hostage negotiator to talk him down. all of that is standard procedure if they can get him to answer the phone. >> bianna called it a while back. >> constant busy signal. clearly the phone is not in service right now. the father couldn't get over how shocked by what he's seeing on tv. he's convinced that police are using excessive force. when i told them they're armed and dangerous. he said that none of this makes sense to him. the father spent ten years in the u.s. working in auto industry,
. that was in the moments after the explosion. i don't know, is richard clarke still with us? let me get back to pierre thomas instead. pierre, from what you're talking to we just heard brad garrett and he's carefully calibrating what he said right now, but are you getting any indication from law enforcement officials right now that they have any idea who might have been behind this? >> again, too early according to my sources. they will have a list of the usual suspects that they will put on the table. but really the key is to try to get that information from the scene to point them in a particular direction. but until that happens, when they have a particular avenue to pursue. what they will look at is they'll go back over all intelligence, some of it which may have been deemed not credible, did they miss anything? they'll comb back through the previous intelligence leading up to today specifically anything that came into the boston area or the east coast. and they'll begin to look back. did we discount anything? did we blow anything away that we thought was not credible that we now know may be credi
of losing and clark any progress on that investigation >> i know that investigation they have this video footage they're looking at. i don't know any of the particulars and the investigation is still open and i don't believe we should talk about that. >> commissioner chief good evening. thank you for your report the department has been tremendously busy. the report on both violent and property crimes is very encouraging it's good to see it down. i want to particularly note the reaction of the department and the handing of the boston bombings locally and the reactions of the local community here. i think that everyday i had occasion to take public transportation i saw additional s f p d officers on each the trains that was a striving different from the everyday practices. downtown particular and in the union square powell street those are areas i was in and i noticed many more officers on and that tooich increase security i think wentrcm along to are you sure our community that we were on alert here. the the public statements made by chief as the events were unfolding of the course of th
on that person you don't know. >> let's go back to dick clark. moving in as carefully as pierre says they have to, how did they go do it? inch by inch? >> they may bring up a robot that the ordinance team has with a camera on it. it sounds like they shot at him. they don't know if he can ignite a bomb. i think the fear is who did they shoot? is he dead or wounded? if alive and has a bomb he can wipe up the police squad going up to check. owe so they may be waiting now. >> this robottrav into aldmeing could ito down intobase could it go up stairs? >> some can. and they can also use fiber optic cable. which can go through little holes in windows and doorways and can then snake like go down stairs. so that is probably what we're waiting for. >> we'd heard reports that you may have within wounded. >> that is right there. is a believe because of the heavy gunfire and a crazy race over the roads that there was a believe he gh have been injured in places they searched they said they found blood. they didn't have time to test the blood to see what came back to. but there was a kind of more of a hope they
, don't we? what is in it? what is in it? >> we have mary higgins clark. she's here with her -- >> oh, i love her. yes. >> - 85th book. we have some lovely ladies going to tell us about how to get rid of all the stress in your life. as if you need more. >> and this is one for you -- sleep. i know you're not getting enough sleep. nobody is. >> i had red zinger last night. >> did that work? >> the celestial tea. >> it worked? >> woke up at 5:00, and i thought, okay, baby, it's that tea. >> we'll teach you how you can sleep better after this. we know a place where tossing and turning have given way to sleeping. where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep, and lunesta eszopiclone can help you get there, like it has for so many people before. do not take lunesta if you are allergic to anything in it. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving or engaging in other activities while asleep without remembering it the next day have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggre
. >> right. general clark is certainly nodding there. you have 30,000 american troops up there. >> we're playing chinese checkers here. you know the game where you have a lot of marbles, it's not chess. you don't take the knight and jump to another square. you sort of move the marbles. the chinese long-term vision is that they're the dominant power in asia. they see no reason for the united states to be there and it makes them a little uncomfortable. they certainly don't want an implosion in the north that would bring a u.s. allied south korea up to their border. in the long term, they don't want the u.s. there. they probably want okinawa back. it used to belong to china a couple hundred years ago, and they want us out of the other areas around the south china sea. don't want our ships there. don't see any reason for it. so these kinds of provocations by the north actually serve china's interests. i'm not saying they're not ambivalent. they don't want an explosion that would disrupt their economic growth. but insofar as they can point out the u.s. presence is contributing to raising t
to the question was there hasn't been any communication, why not just tell that to mr. clark? why go through all of this? >> i'm honestly can't answer that. i would tell him, i don't know. i don't remember that. i believe i did say what was happening in terms of that lack of compromise on the part of the -- at the committee meeting. but i just right now i have no recollection. i'm not going to deny it. i said do what you have to do. okay? thanks. >> are there any views with respect to the 67.34 willful violation finding? >> i have to say i was a little troubled by -- if that's the interpretation that you can find a willful violation based on a pattern of practice but that it's not inadequate response but that there is the alleged practice is not before us. i find that troubling that it was just out there that there is this practice and no evidence of it at least not that was compiled in front of us with any basis. there might be a basis but i don't think the ground work wasn't laid for it. that's what i'm saying. >> i agree with that. >> any other? >> then would you find a violation but not a w
15th, it is tax day and i am pam cook. >> and i am dave clark, steve is talking about wind today. >> wind is taxes and most people don't like that wind, most people are saying, i hate that wind but it is kicking up its heels officially we have a wind advisory and the strongest gusts will come through and it will be mostly sunny and in the 60s, here is sal. >>> traffic continues to move along well driving past the lit windy and as steve has mentioned, it will get windier, metering lights are on soon, let's go back to a tee lay. >>> this is breaking news we have been following and sheriff's deputies say an early morning attack may be tied to violent street gangs which happened on story road, here is new information, janine? >> reporter: we just learned that the victim was actually shot in the back of the head originally they thought he was stabbed originally they told him this but they checked with medical staff and he is going to be okay, he is still conscious. they called 911 after hearing gunshots in the neighborhood and they heard gunshots but no victim. after about an hour the
. what do you say, did you kill john and linda sohus? >> i think you say no. >> but you don't say, i'm a quaker. >> even as clark rockefeller's kidnapping case played out in boston, the california investigators were quietly at work building a case for murder. >> so we basically had to do cpr on this case and just get it up and running. >> to resuscitate the case, they went back to find those folks who had known the suspect when he was calling himself the 13th baronet, christopher chichester, to the episcopal church, where he'd worked his charms after sunday services. one man remembered chichester asking to borrow a chain saw. and now dana ferrare told the detectives something that seemed like key evidence. during one of chichester's backyard trivial pursuit parties, she noticed a part of the lawn looked like it had been freshly dug up. >> i said to him, what's with your yard? what's happened to your yard? and he just said, well, i'm having plumbing problems. >> detectives were astounded at the implications. >> at that point, he's taking ownership of the grave because that's exactly w
ed clark. what can you tell us so far as information that we do and don't know about what happened in boston? >> certainly we know we have a very critical and serious incident. we do not know who the perpetrators are, whether it's a local group or they have international overtones. right now we're working a very active crime scene and homicide investigation trying to gather facts. >> you did note the president said don't jump to conclusions while a lot of people have been talking about a terror attack. he seemed to downplay that. >> we have to evaluate what we have. right now it's a local investigation with a lot of federal assets, but it's an active homicide investigation currently. >> whatever this was it appears to be planned. it has really had the maximum impact. it's at the boston marathon with 500,000 spectators right at the finish line just as thousands of people are coming across the finish line. i know we don't know what happened, but you can read some things into what we do know. >> absolutely. this is a critical indent, a lot of planning that went into -- incident, a lot
don't believe there's this hatred of america by the north korean people. >> general clark, you were saying in the break that you actually were personally involved in a previous north korean crisis. tell me about that and tell me, is it always the same, is it always the same pattern? >> they broke out of the nuclear nonproliferation treaty. they had a nuclear reactor and under the international atomic energy agency, you're supposed to allow your spent uranium fuel to be inspected because you're not allowed to reprocess it and enrich it. but they would not allow the inspection. this was like 1993. and we moved right toward a crisis. and we threatened to go to the united nations then, the united states did, and the north said, at that time it was kim il-song and he said if you bring sanctions against us, this is an act of war. we did the war briefings at the white house, we were prepared, then president clinton and president jimmy carter, there was an agreement we would provide two nuclear reactors. they would take that nuclear reactor out of commission and in the meantime, we would pr
are award-winning chefs, mark dier and clark frazier, the owners of arrow in maine. >> we have some wonderful maine diver scallops with pappardelle. these are just something different. >> just throw them in a pan? >> you don't cook them all the way through. >> you like them well done? >> i do. >> i like it a little more well done. >> where does the garlic come? >> we're going to break it all up. >> yes. i watched my mom do that. >> would you like to start drinking? >> that would be nice. did you bring us some maine wine? >> no, we didn't. >> you have a big season coming up? summer is huge, huge. >> it goes crazy itches cheers. tell us what happens with the garlic. >> we're going to make a little stock. we have one on the right working away, too. >> just a little olive oil to the garlic. >> all right. then we have this working out. this is essentially the same, use the pan drippings from the scallops. when it cooks down a bit, we just add some butter and herbs. >> how long would you cook that? >> maybe four, five minutes. it cooks down pretty fast. we have some marjoram today. >> whi
and they are in charge of. why don't you have any sources of color? did you talk to so and so? clark told people accountable. >> what i'm going to do is take both of your questions back-to- back. there's a lot of different people who have questions who will not able to get to. your first, sir. >> i am john welch. i'm a poet, political lager, cultural critic. my observation, as i go-around five nights a week to portray events around the area, i find, despite the plurality emerging, great stratification. there are 90 blacks in a room and i am one of three others. a few whites and maybe a couple agents. if i go to the writer's center, it's all white. occasionally a black person shows up. what is the role of journalism in trying to pull these diverse communities back together as we stratify and ourselves and like those would like in this emerging? >> great question. >> i am retired physician. i have heard the word raise a lot but not much the word class. >> if you could stand. >> the group i am most interested in are the 1% that are now approaching 25% of all the wealth and the income. where do thes
this isn't sun shine or public records request. listening to mr. clark now, he could have ended up in the same place, he could have said i like record if any exist. and maybe would have been told there are no responsive records. i don't like that pathway because we don't want to make members of the public have to write in legal ease or draft a public consent in order to get within the public records role. but we also and i don't know whether this is that case yet, we also don't want employees of agencies having to become the public library to answer every question. there is a reason you don't have to create documents. please do a research report for me. if there are existing documents are entitled to them on a certain basis. so while this could be misleading, i'm glad to hear mr. gib ner say there is a separate expectation that if somebody asks a question that you are supposed to try to answer it. the answer can be i don't know but i will look if you file a sunshine request or -- gee i don't think so. >> what's the provision for 67.22 that c? >> i think the entire section deals w
event at sfaliason, i don't know if you were there but it had a huge impact on me. i went to hear alaferalaison speak and instead a heard a neuro biologist and a snow flake scientist and tj clark who is an arc historian. it was amazing, it was the most amazing night. and we have actually modeled our public programs off of that event ever since. we like at the arts commission to broad a broader dialogue around the works that we show. not just having the artists themselves present, but to present different ways of thinking about their work, different ways of thinking about contemporary art in general. and leaving you thinking, as you leave. so, tonight we have someone from young and we have a photographer who is not in the show, alongside of our current existing artists. if you like this program, you will like other things that we do in terms of our public programs. tonight, we will hear our featured artists and then from the invited guests who i will introduce. if there is time i will direct a couple of questions in their direction. there will be no q, and a, tonight this program w
the device. >> reporter: ed clark says we will know more in hours and days to come. >> could be that lone wolf sleeper, didn't let a lot out maybe a handful of individuals who could be involved we don't know. >> reporter: what we know is an ounce of doubt, what was supposed to be the ultimate triumph in human ability and perserverance, ended up a low. >>> it is highly likely within 24 hours some body at some level will know, have a good idea who carried this out. >> you need to be patient, follow the good facts. >> experts say the fact that one bomb was recovered intact is a big advantage and maybe they can recover a finger print, human hair anything that could get them one step closer to this. >> thank you. >>> we constantly are getting updates on the situation in boston. at least three people are dead that does include an 8-year-old boy more than 130 people were hurt when those two bombs went off seconds apart near the finish line of the boston marathon. their injuries range from simple cuts and bruises up to amputations and worse police in boston have no suspects in custody as of now.
kleenex to cottonelle, kimberly-clark has been cleaning up in 2013. already soaring over 25%. can the household name behind brands like huggies keep you happy? cramer's exclusive with its ceo is just ahead. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer, #madtweets. send jim an e-mail to "mad money"@cnbc.com. or give us a call. 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney@cnbc.com. revolutionizing an industry can be a tough act to follow, but at xerox we've embraced a new role. working behind the scenes to provide companies with services... like helping hr departments manage benefits and pensions for over 11 million employees. reducing document costs by up to 30%... and processing $421 billion dollars in accounts payables each year. helping thousands of companies simplify how work gets done. how's that for an encore? with xerox, you're ready for real busi. >>> just because the market had a fabulous day today doesn't mean you can afford to stop playing some defense with high-needing food stocks t
and improving margins. plus the company also raised its guidance for the full year and on top of that, kimberly-clark pays a healthy dividend which yields 3%, and they have been a serial increaser. can this stock keep outperforming like it's been doing despite the fact that many analysts don't think it can? let's talk to tom faulk chairman and ceo to hear more about the quarter and what comes next. mr. faulk, welcome to "mad money." >> boo-yah, jim. how is it going? >> going really well. thank you, tom. great to have you on the show. >> jim, let me tell you, your set has never looked better. you've got the finest products in the world there, and we hope you love the "mad money" kleenex. we made it just especially for you. but we want you to know, you and all your friends can make their own customized kleenex boxes. just go out to mykleenex.com and make your own. it will be fantastic. >> this is the kind of thing that mark benioff over at sales forces tells me that kimberly-clark is doing that nobody else is doing. and it's what i want to start talking about. i'm always trying to explain to people tha
them. you don't need a whole lot to figure out someone's dna. bill: how well do you know judy clark the defense lawyer working for the 19-year-old? >> don't know her at all. bill: do you know any of the cases she covered? unabomber, susan smith, neighboring state south carolina near tennessee? >> sure, obviously for what i did in my past life but as an american i know cases. i understand this clearly. i suspect not only is she dealing with complex capital murder case, in other words this kid might be sent to die, she is also dealing with a the case that will have a media crush that will be difficult for any attorney to handle. it is not only court dimension but public dimension requires a lot of experience. bill: you think her priority is to keep the guy alive away from the death penalty? >> yes, yes. bill: not easy. because the other consideration you have to give, phil, whether or not this guy is cooperating. you never know, he might. he may tell these investigators a lot of things in the hospital bed already. >> sure. even if he cooperates you have a conspiracy to commit murder t
they still don't know a lot about autism and they are hoping to further donationels for their cause. -- donations for their cause. >>> we are saying good morning for ktvu channel 2 morning news, dave clark as the morning off and i am brian flores. >>> it was one year ago that a gunman killed seven people and tara moriarty is at the school oikos university to tell us what is being done to honor those victims, tara? >> reporter: some of them have a private memorial, they are hosting two memorial causes to remember the victims. flowers now sit on the steps here at the school at oakland airport and seven rocks symbolize the seven killed april 2nd, 2012. they were killed by 0-year-old one goh -- 40-year-old one goh when he walked on to the campus. he was disgunning talled -- disgun talled over a distribute with to you a significants. -- tuition. today lawmakers in sacramento are scheduled to hear arguments on proposed legislation and could the new bill have pro conveniented the -- presented the -- prevented the shooting? absolutely not, they were bought legally at the time but  it could
day and it is their symbol because it is a puzzle because they still don't know a lot about autism and they are hoping to further donationels for their cause. -- donations for their cause. >>> we are saying good morning for ktvu channel 2 morning news, dave clark as the morning off and i am brian flores. >>> it was one year ago that a gunman killed seven people and tara moriarty is at the school oikos university to tell us what is being done to honor those victims, tara? >> reporter: some of them have a private memorial, they are hosting two memorial causes to remember the victims. flowers now sit on the steps here at the school at oakland airport and seven rocks symbolize the seven killed april 2nd, 2012. they were killed by 0-year-old one goh -- 40-year-old one goh when he walked on to the campus. he was disgunning talled -- disgun talled over a distribute with to you a significants. -- tuition. today lawmakers in sacramento are scheduled to hear arguments on proposed legislation and could the new bill have pro conveniented the -- presented the
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